latest news

06.06.2016

Usque sponsors the 2016 the Space Elevator conference to be held in Seattle, Washington at the Museum of Flight August 19 - 21.

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07.01.2016

Call for beta testers.

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introduction

Usque is a collaborative computer modeling platform for the space elevator.

Usque comes from Latin meaning, all the way, up (to), even (to). The term conveys the idea of limitlessness. And that is what will happen when the space elevator becomes operational. It will take mankind into the limitless bounds of the solar system.

While there are a lot of tools to model different facets of the space elevator they focus on one discipline at a time. Usque is multi-discipline and collaborative by design. More than one discipline can be simulated at the same time. More than one organization can be the source of the mathematical model. More than one model per discipline is allowed. Just pick which model should be used per simulation. The models can be scoped by time and start/stop positions on the tether. That way a computationally expensive model can be used on the time/section of interest and another, less computationally expensive model, can be used on the remainder.

Some mathematical models will come with Usque, of course. But more exciting is that Usque is designed so a community of different scientific experts can contribute mathematical models. Some models will have public domain licenses, while others will have proprietary licenses. They will all be discoverable on a community web site. Each model will have its own forum. Models can be updated just like any software. Requests for mathematical models can be made as well.

The common thread with all the models is the problem domain, the space elevator. Let's lift the dream of the space elevator all the way -- together!

Anything that is theoretically possible will be achieved in practice, no matter what the technical difficulties are, if it is desired greatly enough.

- Arthur C. Clarke Hazards of Prophecy: An Arresting Inquiry into the limits of the Possible: Failures of Nerve and Failures of Imagination (1962)